Category Archives: Riverbed

  • 0

Interested in SD-WAN?

Category : Riverbed

Watch this video with SiliconANGLE to learn how to design and deploy distributed networks using Riverbed’s simple-to-use SD-WAN solution.

Riverbed’s acquisition of Xirrus expands their SD-WAN and cloud networking solution SteelConnect with a robust and proven suite of advanced, cloud-managed Wi-Fi solutions. In this SiliconAngle video episode — Extend SD-WAN to Wireless LAN — Riverbed shows us how easy and quick it is to provision, set up, monitor and optimize highly adaptive WiFI networks.


  • 0

BakerRisk Provides a Deep Dive Into Risk Management Engineering

Category : Riverbed

Baker Engineering and Risk Consultants, Inc. (BakerRisk) works with companies in industries such as oil, gas and chemical processing. Our clients, located in more than 50 countries around the world, encounter various processing hazards inherent to their industries. Examples include oil refineries, gas pipelines and  chemical processing plants. BakerRisk helps them manage their risk exposure in cost effective ways. Our work ultimately assists our clients to reduce risk and conduct their operations in a safe manner.

We have six offices and two test facilities across the US, Canada, and the UK. With only 170 employees, we have a staggering 200 terabytes of storage in our data center. Why so much? Our engineering processes are all about details.  Voluminous data related to the facility, process parameters and environmental conditions are required to analyze risk. This information gets pulled into our proprietary analysis and prediction software tools (e.g., SafeSite3G©, QRATool©, etc.). Simulations run from several hours to several weeks. All this is done to determine what might happen if a valve failed on a stormy June day, for instance.

We also perform forensic investigations into industrial accidents (e.g., accidental explosions). In these situations, all of the above-mentioned information is gathered along with details about the consequences of the accident. When necessary, we  test explosion senerios and replicate blast waves at our test facilities, capturing the test data with pressure gauges, high-speed cameras and other speciality measurement devices.

Our work is a perfect use case for SteelFusion. We must protect sensitive data, and there is a lot of it. Storing data locally is problematic, and our first attempt to centralize it in a data center was a failure. Application performance was dismal and files took up to 10 hours to download. The engineers raised hell—no way were they doing that again.

With SteelFusion, we were able to converge remote storage, server, backup and networking infrastructure into one appliance, the SteelFusion appliance. In addition to eliminating the risk of remotely stored data, SteelFusion delivers application performance as if that data resides locally. Funny story: We originally set up a test of SteelFusion in our largest local office, but didn’t tell anyone there what we were doing. After three weeks, we told them the data was in our central office and they couldn’t believe it; the application performance was so good that they assumed that the data was still on-site.

With SteelFusion, we’ve done for ourselves what we do for our clients—eliminate risk.

Source: https://www.riverbed.com/blogs/bakerrisk-provides-a-deep-dive-into-risk-management-engineering.html?utm_campaign=customer&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin&sf103804442=1

Author: ROBERT MUMPHREY


  • 0

Riverbed and Xirrus—Raising the Bar for Mobile Application Performance

Category : Riverbed

The April 2017 merger of Riverbed and Xirrus brought together two companies with a similar heritage. Riverbed’s success was built on WAN optimization with technology that increases the efficiency of communications over the WAN pipes connecting distributed enterprises. Xirrus’ success is built on WLAN optimization with technology that enables Wi-Fi to scale and replace hard-wired network connections. Both companies are established industry leaders in optimizing the performance of their respective areas of network infrastructure.

Moving forward, the technology integration of solutions from Riverbed, Xirrus and other acquisitions will work together to expand this picture. These solutions are combining to create an application performance optimized infrastructure that spans the entire network from the cloud, across the WAN, and all the way to the network edge.

In line with this vision, Riverbed Xirrus is announcing its first new product since the merger—the XD2-230 access point. The solution provides an ideal platform for delivering wireless services in today’s business climate. A key component of the solution is application visibility and control that enables organizations to strategically deploy application-specific policies on their network that map to their business-specific needs. For example, critical applications such as Office 365, Oracle, or Salesforce can be prioritized for consistent performance vs. recreational applications such as YouTube, Facebook, or Instagram which can allocated best effort treatment.

Leveraging the same application engine that operates in Riverbed SteelConnect SD-WAN gateways, the XD2-230 enables end-to-end application policy orchestration with SteelConnect. An investment in Xirrus Wi-Fi today provides a direct path to a converged, application-centric solution with SteelConnect as that integration work is completed.

Xirrus is well known for scalable, high performance Wi-Fi and the XD2-230 does not disappoint. With software-defined radios enabling all high speed 802.11ac (5GHz) operation and 3×3 11ac Wave 2 Wi-Fi technology, the solution delivers up to 3.9Gbps of total Wi-Fi bandwidth in a single value-priced AP. Controller functionality is built into the AP, eliminating the cost and complexity of separate Wi-Fi controller appliances. Application, security, and location services are integrated into the AP. All together, the result is industry-leading price-performance and system longevity that can handle yet unknown growth requirements well into the future.

Learn more about Riverbed Xirrus XD2-230 

Source: https://www.riverbed.com/blogs/raising-bar-mobile-application-performance.html?utm_campaign=xirrus&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin&sf101958800=1

Author: Bruce Miller


  • 0

Riverbed Launches Industry’s Most Complete Digital Experience Management Solution

Category : Riverbed

Riverbed Technology announced the launch of the most complete and integrated Digital Experience Management solution in the market with the latest release of SteelCentral. With companies continuing to invest heavily in digital business initiatives, their ability to measure and control the quality of user experience remains a challenge. Riverbed SteelCentral now empowers customers to measure and troubleshoot all parts of the digital experience, from the user’s experience on the device to the back-end network, infrastructure, cloud and application.

According to a recently published report from analyst firm EMA, 59% of enterprise leaders agree that IT and the business share the responsibility for Digital Experience Management.[1] At the same time, analyst firm Gartner’s research found that fewer than 5% of global enterprises have strategically implemented Digital Experience Monitoring.[2] The latest update to Riverbed SteelCentral delivers an integrated, business focused and user-centric solution for managing the digital experience of end users. Moreover, it offers new integrated monitoring and analysis of the complete end user service – from the business activity on the user’s device, across the network, app servers, down to application code – to provide a fast and effective solution for ensuring reliable and high quality end user experience.

The latest release of SteelCentral:

  • Delivers enriched end user performance monitoring and provides integrated visibility into Digital Experience
  • Reduces the risk during application migrations, both on and off the Cloud
  • Enables businesses to manage outcomes across the application lifecycle
  • Delivers integrated network and infrastructure troubleshooting and monitoring

SteelCentral Digital Experience Management Release Ensures Your Digital Transformation Delivers

“Our customers are making big ticket, highly strategic investments in digital business transformation initiatives to drive customer intimacy and employee/partner productivity. Delivering a flawless digital experience couldn’t be more critical to their success. But with the adoption of cloud and mobile technologies, they are finding that traditional tools are unable to holistically measure and manage a user’s digital experience,” said Mike Sargent, Senior Vice President and General Manager of SteelCentral at Riverbed. “SteelCentral now delivers the most complete, modular and integrated Digital Experience Management solution in the market, helping enterprises deliver a reliable and consistently high quality end user experience. With the breadth and depth of insight we now provide – down to the individual transaction level – we are taking visibility to a whole new level to help our customers achieve their strategic goals.”

Riverbed SteelCentral: Integrated Digital Experience Management

SteelCentral Delivers Enriched End User Performance Monitoring and Provides Integrated Visibility into Digital Experience

This new release features the integration between SteelCentral Portal, SteelCentral Aternity, and SteelCentral AppInternals. This means that SteelCentral users can now incorporate the device-based view of end user experience providing IT and business executives with a single-pane-of-glass view of IT performance and its impact on end users. In addition, the integrated workflow between SteelCentral Aternity and AppInternals provides an integrated monitoring system for the entire end user service and allows IT to rapidly troubleshoot business-critical applications across devices and applications. This results in a one-stop-shop for the variety of teams involved in Digital Experience Management, from end user services, to app developers and operations, to IT and business executives.

Riverbed SteelCentral Digital Experience Management Explainer

SteelCentral Reduces the Risk During Application Migrations – On and Off the Cloud

As companies continue to migrate applications to the cloud, understanding the impact on application and network performance is challenging. Cloud performance, particularly as it relates to the network, is a common blind spot for most enterprises. With this release, SteelCentral introduces application migration planning and prediction. This enables network planning and architecture teams to simulate and predict traffic behavior and impact on the network prior to application migrations – from data center to data center, from data center to cloud, and between cloud providers. As a result, companies are able to leverage data, not hunches, when planning cloud migrations for applications.

SteelCentral Enables Businesses to Manage Outcomes Across the Application Lifecycle

As organizations adopt DevOps, Development, QA and operations teams are streamlining, integrating and automating processes to increase agility and quality of application releases. SteelCentral AppInternals now enables IT teams to consume performance insights and diagnostics across the application lifecycle. Leveraging new REST API’s, development and QA teams can add performance testing to their build tool chain and ensure that releases are optimized for production; operations teams can consume alerts on popular collaboration tools like Slack and HipChat; and support teams can automatically open tickets on incident management tools to log issues, their root causes and diagnoses. In addition, teams can use the API to extract metrics and enrich existing reports and tools.

SteelCentral Delivers Integrated Network and Infrastructure Troubleshooting

Riverbed is also introducing a new integration between NetProfiler and NetIM that helps network managers understand the impact of network infrastructure on network performance. This integration is another example of how SteelCentral is enabling cross domain collaboration, breaking down the communication barriers created by the deployment of disjointed point monitoring solutions.

steelcentral products after latest launch

“Being able to track the end user experience is only one part of the puzzle, and although it provides very valuable information, I wanted to see the whole performance and experience picture on one pane of glass,” said Baker Donelson CIO John D. Green. “This release, integrating the technology further into the SteelCentral product line, is able to give me that single pane of glass view. With the Riverbed and Aternity combination, there is now a mix of tools, that when combined into a single pane of glass, gives you total visibility across your network, from the servers to the circuits.”

steelcentral platform image

 

“End user experience is critical to the success of many digital business initiatives.  Poor application performance impacts brand perceptions and customer satisfaction, yet, many organizations struggle to understand how all the infrastructure, software, and end user device elements of the application delivery chain impact end user experience,” said Mary Johnston Turner, IDC Research Vice President, Enterprise Systems Management Software. “The latest release of SteelCentral offers blended device-based end user experience monitoring which provides customers with an end to end view of application performance spanning from the user’s experience on the device to the back-end network and infrastructure. This capability delivers value to business strategies as well as IT teams as they work to execute digital transformation strategies.”

 

[1] EMA: User, Customer, and Digital Experience: Where Service and Business Performance Come Together, Dennis Drogseth, Julie Craig, February 2017

[2] Gartner: Innovation Insight for Digital Experience Monitoring, Will Cappelli, Oct 14, 2016

 

Source: https://www.riverbed.com/press-releases/riverbed-launches-industrys-most-complete-digital-experience-management-solution.html


  • 0

SD-WAN vs. MPLS

Category : Riverbed

Keeping up with traditional management approaches for wide-area networks (WANs) has become a slightly more complex endeavor these days. Scaling application and business requirements are placing undue demand on networks, leaving many IT and Line of Business leaders scrambling to keep up. Personally, we’re big advocates of networking that functions according to traffic demand and flow, which is why we do a lot of talking about software-defined wide-area networks (SD-WANs) and the value they can bring to the bottom line.

The ROI from SD-WAN cannot be understated: It gives your network the ability to leapfrog from Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) to the cloud to Internet connections to virtual private networks (VPNs), without missing a beat. IT admins are able to split traffic between high- and low-cost WAN links based on business-criticality of the traffic. A more hybrid-like strategy allows access for more overall bandwidth in the branch and reduces network costs. This cost savings is especially significant when trying to wean networks off of MPLS, which gets expensive quickly.

If the ROI isn’t enough, consider the advantages and disadvantages inherent to MPLS vs. SD-WAN, and what each approach to WAN could add to your business.

The basics of MPLS

MPLS has traditionally been used in most telecommunications environments, but industry use cases have expanded over the years. Fundamentally, MPLS enables transportation of data of any protocol. It allows most packets to be forwarded at Layer 2 rather than having to be passed up to Layer 3. Packets are labeled by the ingress router on entry into the service provider’s network, meaning routing switches perform packet forwarding based only on those labels. The last step happens when the egress router removes the label and passes the original IP packet on to its final destination.

Secure and private, MPLS offers reliable bandwidth provisioned for packet forwarding. It moves data from one node to the next based on labels, instead of lengthy network addresses. And it can improve Quality of Service (QoS), as well as support applications like VPNs.

Unfortunately, studies have shown that an MPLS megabyte can cost up to 200x more than a broadband megabyte monthly. Additionally, users are reporting increasing levels of provisioning delays across providers. Rising internet bandwidth and speeds have forced IT teams to question the relevance of MPLS in today’s agile and cost-conscious world.

The basics of SD-WAN

SD-WAN is software-defined networking technology which was built to optimize the usage of cloud-based applications like Office 365 and Salesforce. This technology can be applied to WAN hardware or software nodes, as well as the cloud. These nodes form virtual overlays across underlying transport services; traffic routing and path selection happens according to user-defined policies. All SD-WANs today operate across internet connections, branch offices, and private data services.

SD-WAN was built to optimize the usage of cloud-based applications like Office 365, and Salesforce, that organizations are rapidly transitioning to. This approach can lower costs thanks to unified management and diminished network complexities, enabling you to employ a variety of hybrid networking models. SD-WAN also guarantees higher performance as a result of leveraging multiple network paths and switching between them based on real-time analysis of link performance metrics such as jitter, packet loss and throughput. Increased programmability and automation boosts network agility by decreasing manual configuration steps. Ultimately, built in end-to-end visibility, security, and control simplifies IT management.

Some businesses have been proactive (and fortunate) enough to stay ahead of the rising tides of data and demands from the cloud. For those who have maintained legacy hardware systems, and find themselves confronting rising annual maintenance costs, let’s talk. The implementation of a new network is complex, and we can help you sort through the SD-WAN vs. MPLS vs. cloud vs. exclusive Internet debate to ease the process and determine your next moves.

Source: https://www.riverbed.com/blogs/sdwan-vs-mpls.html?utm_campaign=sdwan&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin&sf98057124=1

Author:  SHREYAK SHAH


  • 0

Comparing Four End User Experience Monitoring Methods

Category : Riverbed

Truth be told, the lines between End User Experience Monitoring (EUEM) and Application Performance Management (APM) are pretty blurry.

It’s easy to see why. Gartner’s 2016 Magic Quadrant for APM lists Digital Experience Monitoring as the first of three functional dimensions of Application Performance Monitoring. This makes sense. After all, developers and IT Operations teams need to consider how application parameters like availability, latency, response time, and usability appear to the end user. And they must determine how many end users are affected when they troubleshoot app problems.

So, it’s no surprise that every Application Performance Management vendor now touts End User Experience Monitoring as part of its solution.

The differences in approaches to End User Experience Monitoring

The result is a confusing End User Experience Monitoring market. Understand the differences between these four approaches to EUEM to ensure you choose a product that addresses your needs.

1. Synthetic monitoring

Synthetic monitoring runs a script that simulates users’ interactions with key applications. IT programs the scripts to run from various locations at regular intervals. For this reason, some refer to this method as “robotic testing.” Synthetic monitoring products proactively identify major execution or availability issues that could affect user experience.

This approach determines application baselines and identifies availability issues, even for applications that are not used around the clock. It also works well for applications that access third party services using APIs.

Creating and maintaining the scripts on which synthetic monitoring relies can be time-consuming. More importantly, synthetic monitoring only emulates user experience. It does not measure actual end user experience.

So, while synthetic monitoring can identify application performance issues in general, it cannot identify or help resolve any particular end user’s complaint. This limitation presents a problem for the service desk. If a user calls the service desk with a problem, this solution tells them nothing about what the end user was actually doing or experiencing.

2. JavaScript injection

This method of End User Experience Monitoring injects JavaScript code into a web application to time what happens on the end user’s browser. JavaScript injection can also call 3rd party apps. Unlike synthetic monitoring, JavaScript injection does monitor actual end user experience. But it works only for web applications and hybrid mobile apps. IT teams must also monitor the end user experience of client-server apps, apps that run on virtual infrastructure, and apps hosted by 3rd parties.

Although JavaScript injection can monitor web applications as the user sees them, it does not have visibility into the performance and health of the user’s device. So, it won’t be able to tell app development or desktop services teams that the app is slow because the end user’s device is under-resourced.

Monitoring application performance of SaaS, or other applications that are hosted outside of the enterprise’s data center requires a different approach. In these situations, IT must inject Javascript using proxy servers or load balancers. This work-around adds complexity, expense, and implementation challenges for fragmented network topologies.

3. Real User Monitoring

Real User Monitoring (RUM) relies on network-based packet capture from the network, browser, or application for End User Experience Monitoring. This method collects network-based response time and error metrics that affect end user experience, such as HTTP/HTTPS or other network transactions on the wire, such as TCP. Unlike synthetic monitoring, RUM collects metrics that reflect actual (or real) end user experience. Hence the name.

To use this approach, IT must identify the optimum points in the network to aggregate and filter traffic for analysis. Although hardware based approaches becomes more expensive as network speeds increase, the packet aggregation and brokering equipment gear can also be used for security and network management.

While RUM solutions collect data that relate to end user experience, they do not provide visibility into the actual screen render time within the browser or application. A web or network request traverses the wire in a millisecond. But it can take 10 seconds or more for the screen to render if there is heavy client-side processing or a large volume of data.

Real User Monitoring doesn’t work for the broad array of enterprise applications that are not web-based. It also doesn’t work for activities that don’t generate network traffic, such as opening a cached email. Like synthetic monitoring and JavaScript injection, RUM approaches lack visibility into the performance and health of the user’s device.

4. Device-based End User Experience Monitoring

Device Performance Monitoring (DPM) solutions address part of what’s required for End User Experience Monitoring. DPM products use light-weight agents to monitor the health and performance of end users PCs, laptops, and virtual desktops. They track operating system metrics like resource utilization and health. Some DPM products also can identify installed applications and identify app crashes. These metrics certainly relate to end user experience. But they don’t provide any visibility into how end users are actually experiencing the applications they use.

Device-based End User Experience Monitoring products like SteelCentral Aternity take the next step, by doing all of this and more.

End user experience monitoring business activitiesSteelCentral Aternity monitors business activities, like “look up a patient record”

Aternity monitors the performance of applications as they render on the screens of the user’s device. Further, Aternity monitors the performance of business activities performed by the end user. These are company-defined user interactions with applications in the context of a business process. For example, “look up a patient record,” or “process a claim,” or “check inventory.” Aternity automatically generates baselines for what constitutes acceptable performance for these activities. It generates alerts when performance deviates from baseline. Unlike DPM products, Aternity presents a true picture of end user experience, by correlating these three streams of data together – device health and performance, application performance as seen by the end user, and user behavior.

Source: https://www.riverbed.com/blogs/comparing-four-end-user-experience-monitoring-methods.html?utm_campaign=steelcentral&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin&sf96111132=1

Author: Mike Marks


  • 0

Comparing Four End User Experience Monitoring Methods

Category : Riverbed

Truth be told, the lines between End User Experience Monitoring (EUEM) and Application Performance Management (APM) are pretty blurry.

It’s easy to see why. Gartner’s 2016 Magic Quadrant for APM lists Digital Experience Monitoring as the first of three functional dimensions of Application Performance Monitoring. This makes sense. After all, developers and IT Operations teams need to consider how application parameters like availability, latency, response time, and usability appear to the end user. And they must determine how many end users are affected when they troubleshoot app problems.

So, it’s no surprise that every Application Performance Management vendor now touts End User Experience Monitoring as part of its solution.

The differences in approaches to End User Experience Monitoring

The result is a confusing End User Experience Monitoring market. Understand the differences between these four approaches to EUEM to ensure you choose a product that addresses your needs.

1. Synthetic monitoring

Synthetic monitoring runs a script that simulates users’ interactions with key applications. IT programs the scripts to run from various locations at regular intervals. For this reason, some refer to this method as “robotic testing.” Synthetic monitoring products proactively identify major execution or availability issues that could affect user experience.

This approach determines application baselines and identifies availability issues, even for applications that are not used around the clock. It also works well for applications that access third party services using APIs.

Creating and maintaining the scripts on which synthetic monitoring relies can be time-consuming. More importantly, synthetic monitoring only emulates user experience. It does not measure actual end user experience.

So, while synthetic monitoring can identify application performance issues in general, it cannot identify or help resolve any particular end user’s complaint. This limitation presents a problem for the service desk. If a user calls the service desk with a problem, this solution tells them nothing about what the end user was actually doing or experiencing.

2. JavaScript injection

This method of End User Experience Monitoring injects JavaScript code into a web application to time what happens on the end user’s browser. JavaScript injection can also call 3rd party apps. Unlike synthetic monitoring, JavaScript injection does monitor actual end user experience. But it works only for web applications and hybrid mobile apps. IT teams must also monitor the end user experience of client-server apps, apps that run on virtual infrastructure, and apps hosted by 3rd parties.

Although JavaScript injection can monitor web applications as the user sees them, it does not have visibility into the performance and health of the user’s device. So, it won’t be able to tell app development or desktop services teams that the app is slow because the end user’s device is under-resourced.

Monitoring application performance of SaaS, or other applications that are hosted outside of the enterprise’s data center requires a different approach. In these situations, IT must inject Javascript using proxy servers or load balancers. This work-around adds complexity, expense, and implementation challenges for fragmented network topologies.

3. Real User Monitoring

Real User Monitoring (RUM) relies on network-based packet capture from the network, browser, or application for End User Experience Monitoring. This method collects network-based response time and error metrics that affect end user experience, such as HTTP/HTTPS or other network transactions on the wire, such as TCP. Unlike synthetic monitoring, RUM collects metrics that reflect actual (or real) end user experience. Hence the name.

To use this approach, IT must identify the optimum points in the network to aggregate and filter traffic for analysis. Although hardware based approaches becomes more expensive as network speeds increase, the packet aggregation and brokering equipment gear can also be used for security and network management.

While RUM solutions collect data that relate to end user experience, they do not provide visibility into the actual screen render time within the browser or application. A web or network request traverses the wire in a millisecond. But it can take 10 seconds or more for the screen to render if there is heavy client-side processing or a large volume of data.

Real User Monitoring doesn’t work for the broad array of enterprise applications that are not web-based. It also doesn’t work for activities that don’t generate network traffic, such as opening a cached email. Like synthetic monitoring and JavaScript injection, RUM approaches lack visibility into the performance and health of the user’s device.

4. Device-based End User Experience Monitoring

Device Performance Monitoring (DPM) solutions address part of what’s required for End User Experience Monitoring. DPM products use light-weight agents to monitor the health and performance of end users PCs, laptops, and virtual desktops. They track operating system metrics like resource utilization and health. Some DPM products also can identify installed applications and identify app crashes. These metrics certainly relate to end user experience. But they don’t provide any visibility into how end users are actually experiencing the applications they use.

Device-based End User Experience Monitoring products like SteelCentral Aternity take the next step, by doing all of this and more.

SteelCentral Aternity monitors business activities, like “look up a patient record”

Aternity monitors the performance of applications as they render on the screens of the user’s device. Further, Aternity monitors the performance of business activitiesperformed by the end user. These are company-defined user interactions with applications in the context of a business process. For example, “look up a patient record,” or “process a claim,” or “check inventory.” Aternity automatically generates baselines for what constitutes acceptable performance for these activities. It generates alerts when performance deviates from baseline. Unlike DPM products, Aternity presents a true picture of end user experience, by correlating these three streams of data together – device health and performance, application performance as seen by the end user, and user behavior.

Source: https://www.riverbed.com/blogs/comparing-four-end-user-experience-monitoring-methods.html?utm_campaign=steelcentral&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin&sf96111132=1

Author: Mike Marks


  • 0

Riverbed at Mobile World Congress 2017

Category : Riverbed

Riverbed was at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2017 to unveil our latest carrier-grade offering. Riverbed Service Delivery Platform helps develop, deploy and deliver a wide variety of services from VNFs to business applications.

We are already looking forward to connecting with our customers, partners and the analyst community at MWC 2018, and cannot wait to re-visit beautiful Barcelona.

Learn more about our Service Delivery Platform here: http://rvbd.ly/2na1M1f


  • 0

The Cloud: A Growing Driver for SD-WAN

Category : Riverbed

Software-defined wide area networking (SD-WAN) has become one of the buzziest sectors in enterprise networking these days, promising agility and cost-savings. But a key driver of SD-WAN is that it can be used to intelligently optimize and secure connections to the cloud—including connecting users directly to cloud data centers—while offering centralized management across locations. Plus, it allows an application-aware approach to WAN, which IT managers see as an increasing imperative in an era where cloud services are becoming pervasive in the enterprise.

SD-WAN helps organizations overcome the complexity and rigidity of managing dynamic workloads, by providing automation and simplified management for cloud networking.

Overall, the SD-WAN sector is poised for mainstream adoption this year, with one in five U.S. respondents in a survey from 451 Research saying their companies are planning to deploy the technology in the next 12 months. An additional 30 percent of respondents reported that their companies are considering SD-WAN, pointing to additional future growth. One in 10 already have a solution deployed today.

Enterprise migration to the cloud meanwhile is happening independently of SD-WAN adoption, but it’s pulling along the SD-WAN market. Respondents in the 451 Research survey ranked improved cloud or internet performance as a top-three impetus for rolling out SD-WAN, right behind reducing deployment and reconfiguration times and MPLS replacement.

“Enterprise customers are using multiple cloud services and have multiple branches, and they need to make sure the performance for those services is acceptable,” said Mike Sapien, vice president and chief analyst US, Enterprise Services, Ovum, which also sees cloud enablement as a top-three use case. “They also need reliable connections to the main cloud resources, be it Amazon Web ServicesMicrosoft Azure, etc. That means implementing QoS, but also the ability to make changes in a network on the fly to improve performance or address increased usage, and using automatic traffic routing to create redundancy and diversity. SD-WAN fits that bill.”

SD-WAN: An Enterprise Game-Changer

In a traditional WAN configuration, satellite or branch locations are generally connected to a headquarters via MPLS or other dedicated circuits, which are all from the same service provider (thus limiting connectivity options). Each branch router acts independently, and traffic is switched based on static routing. Visibility into each connection is possible on a link-by-link basis, but taking a holistic view of the entire WAN has been the purview of very specialized software.

SD-WAN on the other hand abstracts the control plane from the physical devices at each location, allowing centralized visibility and management across everything in the WAN that’s forwarding traffic. Enterprises can “mix and match” the types of connectivity being used and the carriers that are delivering it, allowing for much greater flexibility and the capability for dynamic, automatic failover with no need to reprogram routers or call a provider to have one’s MPLS switched over to a new circuit.

And, because the WAN becomes programmable, IT admins can add analytics and app-aware policy engine control across the entire footprint, along with the ability to dynamically (and automatically) balance traffic across all of the links to enforce QoS thresholds for specific cloud applications.

“SD-WAN is a way to do away with the hub-and-spoke enterprise WAN architecture to instead allow branches to connect directly to the cloud or elsewhere, with QoS and the ability to centrally enforce policy,” said Cliff Grossner, senior research director and advisor for the Cloud & Data Center Research Practice at IHS Markit. “People first picked up on its ability to drive cost-savings through WAN optimization and the ability to reduce MPLS reliance with broadband links; but the cloud QoS story is now being spurred along by newer start-ups that have jumped into the market, and it’s an important use case for SDN in general.”

This is only going to get bigger as a market: Enterprises this year expect growth in their hosting and cloud services spending to outpace growth in overall IT spending by 25.8 percent to 12 percent, according to 451 Research. Among large businesses (1,000-9,999 employees), an average of 33.3 percent growth is expected in hosting and cloud services spending.

A full 88 percent of all respondents said they expect to increase their hosting and cloud services budgets in 2017 versus 2016, compared to 70 percent that expect to increase total IT budgets year over year.

Future Development

There are some lingering challenges to the SD-WAN market, despite the stars aligning for triple-digit growth this year. The top three barriers to deployment, according to 451 Research, are the cost of new equipment services (63 percent); worries about the maturity of existing SD-WAN offerings (53%); internet performance (52 percent); and security gaps created in the network (50 percent). To the latter point, half of respondents who have already deployed SD-WAN (53 percent) having increased their investment in security following the rollout.

“The SD-WAN market is poised for major growth over the coming years, which will be accompanied by growing pains,” said Jim Duffy, senior networking analyst at 451 Research, which is projecting a 200 percent year-over-year increase in the adoption rate for 2017. “IT practitioners are still ironing out the wrinkles when it comes to SD-WAN. The technology offers streamlined management and increased network agility, but its cost reduction impact is constrained by the need for increased security and the continued reliance on MPLS. The scope of SD-WAN is likely to expand to address these constraints and enhance customers’ return on investment.”

Sapien predicts that cloud providers will soon begin integrating SD-WAN service directly. In fact, cloud service brokers are already starting to offer a set of third-party resources from their own platforms to

stitch solutions together with a range of network offers (including SD-WAN), cloud connections and a variety of cloud services.

“Down the line, I can see, say, Microsoft bundling SD-WAN with Office 365 service. It’s a good marriage,” he said. “These are early days for SD-WAN implementation, and there will be changes and new versions coming along,” said Sapien. “We’re seeing a new iteration of these services every six months, because the technology, service providers offering it and adoption interest are all new things. It’s so rare to have this amount of dynamic growth for any technology.”

Source: https://www.sdxcentral.com/articles/analysis/cloud-growing-driver-sd-wan/2017/06/?sf91954254=1

Author: 


  • 0

Five Reasons Your Digital Experience Management Strategy Could Fail

Category : Riverbed

You can be sure your CEO has digital experience on his or her radar. According to Gartner’s 2017 CEO Survey, CEOs are more focused this year on how technology and product innovation drive company growth. In the last few years of Gartner’s CEO survey, technology has never ranked so high on the list of CEO priorities. So the pressure is on IT to deliver excellent digital experiences. But this is easier said than done. Here are five reasons why your digital experience management strategy could fail.

1. Application complexity

Although Gartner’s survey shows that CEOs are relying on technology to drive growth, it also shows that they rank technology impediments as the #2 internal constraint to growth. How can technology be both a driver of growth and an impediment to it? Application complexity is one major reason. Application performance management is more challenging than ever before.

  • Applications must scale based on demand and remain highly responsive 24/7 across geographies. Innovative applications interact with legacy applications, so IT must support the full portfolio—web, mobile, apps running in the cloud, on virtual infrastructure, and legacy client-server environments.
  • End users and customers no longer interact with static applications at discrete times. They interact continuously with applications whose architectures have evolved to become modular, distributed, and dynamic.

2. The expanding population of end users

End User Experience Management is also more complex. Customers aren’t the only ones whose digital experience matters. The Gartner definition of Digital Experience Monitoring also includes employees, partners, and suppliers. If that weren’t enough of a challenge, the advent of IoT requires IT to ensure an excellent digital experience for machines as well!

 

3. Different teams have different goals

According to a recent EMA Digital Experience Management report, 59% of enterprise leaders agree that IT and the business share the responsibility for Digital Experience Management. Although they share responsibility for ensuring excellent digital experience, groups within IT and the business have specific needs which vary greatly, depending on their roles.

  • Business executives must ensure they meet goals for revenue, customer satisfaction, and workforce productivity.
  • IT executives need to staff their teams efficiently to architect and support digital business initiatives, ensure technology investments are made appropriately, and hold IT vendors accountable to SLAs that meet customer objectives.
  • IT and Network Operations teams must ensure the network and infrastructure can support new services, identify and resolve issues quickly, and understand the impact of problems on digital experience.
  • DevOps teams must release new apps and digital services quickly, identify and resolve issues in test and QA, and ensure excellent application performance perform in real-world environments.
  • Cloud architects need to plan, design, and implement the infrastructure to support new services, and scale up and down as demand changes.
  • End User Services teams require visibility into the digital experience of customers, employees, partners, and suppliers to identify and triage issues before users call to complain.

4. A variety of analytics are required to measure success

“You can’t manage what you can’t measure.” Management expert Peter Drucker’s famous saying applies equally well to tracking the success of a Digital Experience Management initiative. With varying responsibilities, each group in IT and the business requires different metrics and analytics to indicate their progress in achieving their Digital Experience Management goals.

Digital Experience Monitoring tools must therefore supply a broad set of business and technical analytics, such as application performance, network performance, infrastructure capacity analysis, and end user productivity across the extended enterprise.

5. The IT monitoring visibility gap

IT-Monitoring-Visibility-GapAs IT organizations respond to CEO priorities and roll out new services to drive growth, they need a cross-domain understanding of applications, the networks and infrastructure on which they run, and the impact they have on end user experience.

But the typical enterprise has from 4-15 different network monitoring tools, which complicates troubleshooting, change management, and other aspects of service level management. While these tools provide insight into the performance and availability of their particular domain, they lack visibility into the actual digital experience of customers, the workforce, partners and suppliers.

Addressing Digital Experience Management challenges

An effective Digital Experience Management approach closes this visibility gap and enables you to measure the end user experience of the entire population of end users. Each group within IT and the business gets the metrics and analytics they need to ensure a successful digital experience outcome.

When it comes to meeting or exceeding your CEO’s expectations for driving growth, the key is to ensure you have an effective Digital Experience Management strategy. Failing to do so could mean lost revenue, lost productivity, and even irreparable damage to a company brand. In the next few weeks, we’ll extend this Digital Experience Management series to show you how Riverbed SteelCentral can help.

Source: https://www.riverbed.com/blogs/five-reasons-your-digital-experience-management-strategy-could-fail.html?utm_campaign=steelcentral&utm_content=mikem&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin&sf91954046=1

Author: Mike Marks


Support