Category Archives: Palo Alto

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8 Months to Go – Are You Getting the Most Out of What You Already Own?

Category : Palo Alto

As we move closer to the May 2018 deadline for GDPR, more and more businesses are focused on ensuring their ability to meet the requirements set out by the regulation. All too often, people assume this requires additional investments, which at some level will be true; but you should also be challenging your organisation as to how you get more from what you already have.

Equally, I hear many looking to data loss prevention (DLP) and encryption tools as primary requirements for protecting data. However, having worked with both for many years during previous stages of my career, I would highlight that these, like every capability, come with their own implementation challenges. Often, adjacent technologies can help reduce the scope of these challenges and the associated costs.  To cover all of these would be a mammoth blog; as such I’m only going to pick a couple, just to start your creative thinking and help you on your GDPR journey.

Here, I’m going to focus on how your firewall can help reduce the effort and cost of better securing the personally identifiable information (PII) data lifecycle. How do you validate if you are getting the most from what you have already, and where could you join up security processes that today may be owned and implemented by different teams in the business?

The all too common first thought with PII data lifecycle management is to try and classify all your data – a task that has the potential to take until the end of time – as every day we generate new data or new instances of existing data. Often, much of this focus is on how to bring clarity to the volume of unstructured data.

You need a change of mindset, which is not to try and define where all your PII data is, but instead to define – and then enforce – where your PII data can and should be. This reduces the scope of where you need to then apply DLP controls.

Most organisations already have insight on PII data in known business processes. In practice, this could include customer relationship management (CRM) tools, threat intelligence that may include some form of PII data, and HR systems. However, there is often still a significant gap between where structured data is and where it is thought to be. Being able to truly define where it is will allow you to start identifying the points where it becomes unstructured data.

If you are using good Layer 7 firewalls in your business, you can use these to help map your real-time application usage. This will allow you to see which apps are talking with which others, those that are communicating outside the business, and which users are doing this and at what volume.

The core goal here is to think to the Zero Trust model: can you segment your organisation’s PII data – allowing you to reduce where it can move – into being unstructured and, more importantly, reduce the scope of what you need to apply security to. Likewise, such visibility can help you define at which points you need encryption versus the points where the data should never reside or be accessed to start with.

Now pivot to managing the PII itself: a good Layer 7 firewall will typically include some level of content inspection. If you do have a DLP solution in place that tags data, your firewall should also be able to leverage the tags inserted into the data. You may wonder why that’s of value; well, your firewall can typically inspect inside encrypted traffic, which may give access to data the DLP solution could not otherwise analyse. Also, depending on your configuration, you may be able to leverage your firewall to give you more enforcement points if you have used it to segment your organisation’s system traffic.

If you don’t have a DLP tool in place but are looking to enforce your PII dataflows, once again, a Layer 7 firewall will likely have some content inspection. While not as rich as that provided by DLP, many will allow you to look at regular expressions (words, common structure forms like banking card data, etc.) in common file types that will give you a light version that may suffice, in some cases, to both map and enforce data usage.

So, what are the takeaways here?

Take anything to the Nth degree and it can solve a problem. DLP and encryption are key to managing the PII data lifecycle. However, they can be expensive from both a Capex and Opex perspective. You can use other tools and processes to reduce dependence on them.

GDPR is a rare opportunity to take a step back. It’s amazing to see how many organisations invest in state-of-the-art technology, such as a next-generation firewall, that can do all these things, but then still use it like their 20-year-old port and protocol firewall that works at Layer 3.

Before you spend any more of your valuable budget, challenge yourself and your organisation on what you already have. Ensure you know the capabilities at the core, as well as the additional components. Map them out and then consider how they could streamline your processes to reduce the scope and effort. In this instance, looking at how you zone your traffic or go to a full Zero Trust model is not a specific GDPR callout, but it does align to the notion of what is state-of-the-art best practice and, more importantly, what could reduce where your PII data proliferates. This means less to then secure, and less risk to the organisation.

 Source: https://researchcenter.paloaltonetworks.com/2017/10/cso-gdpr-8-months-go-getting-already/
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Palo Alto Networks Unit 42 Vulnerability Research September and October 2017 Disclosures

Category : Palo Alto

As part of Unit 42’s ongoing threat research, we can now disclose that Palo Alto Networks Unit 42 researchers have discovered vulnerabilities that have been addressed by Microsoft in their September and October security update releases.

CVE Vulnerability Name Affected Products Researcher
CVE-2017-8567 Microsoft Office Remote Code Execution Microsoft Excel for Mac 2011 Jin Chen
CVE-2017-8749 Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability Internet Explorer 10, Internet Explorer 11 Hui Gao
CVE-2017-11793 Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability Internet Explorer 9, Internet Explorer 10, Internet Explorer 11 Hui Gao
CVE-2017-11822 Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability Internet Explorer 9, Internet Explorer 11 Hui Gao

For current customers with a Threat Prevention subscription, Palo Alto Networks has also released IPS signatures providing proactive protection from these vulnerabilities. Traps, Palo Alto Networks advanced endpoint protection, can block memory corruption based exploits of this nature.

Palo Alto Networks is a regular contributor to vulnerability research in Microsoft, Adobe, Apple, Google Android and other ecosystems. By proactively identifying these vulnerabilities, developing protections for our customers, and sharing the information with the security community, we are removing weapons used by attackers to threaten users, and compromise enterprise, government, and service provider networks.

Source: https://researchcenter.paloaltonetworks.com/2017/10/unit42-palo-alto-networks-unit-42-vulnerability-research-september-october-2017-disclosures/

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The Cybersecurity Canon, Data and Goliath, The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

Category : Palo Alto

We modeled the Cybersecurity Canon after the Baseball or Rock & Roll Hall-of-Fame, except for cybersecurity books. We have more than 25 books on the initial candidate list, but we are soliciting help from the cybersecurity community to increase the number to be much more than that. Please write a review and nominate your favorite. 

The Cybersecurity Canon is a real thing for our community. We have designed it so that you can directly participate in the process. Please do so!

Executive Summary

Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World” is a book meant to scare you, and it does a good job. The book is designed to get our attention and serve as a wake-up call on a number of issues that beg for more robust public discussion. Chief among these issues are mass surveillance from governments and the commercial world, and how this is affecting personal privacy and even public security. More importantly, I believe Bruce Schneier offers some excellent recommendations as to what we should all be talking about and doing when it comes to bringing these critical issues out of the shadows and into the light. Finally, this book offers some ideas that I believe can serve as the basis for the formulation of improved norms of responsible behavior, more effective government and industry policies and regulations, and perhaps more balanced national and international laws relevant to the digital age. As such, this book deserves a place of honor in the Cybersecurity Canon.

Review

I had the opportunity to visit the Harvard Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge last April to be interviewed by the director of Harvard’s Cybersecurity Project. Prior to my interview, I was able to speak with Bruce Schneier, who was working with Harvard’s Cybersecurity Project at the time, and he was kind enough to provide me with an autographed copy of this book. I was instantly inspired to read and review it for the Cybersecurity Canon. Little did I realize at the time that another Cybersecurity Canon member, Steve Winterfeld, had already reviewed Bruce’s book in October 2015. However, after reading Steve’s wonderful review of the book, I wanted to provide another perspective that I believe is relevant and timely. So, this is an endorsement of Steve’s earlier book review, and it also provides additional thoughts that I hope will generate interest within the professional cybersecurity community.

In Steve Winterfeld’s earlier review, he expertly described how the book is organized into three sections: the world we are creatingwhat’s at stake and what to do about it. As mentioned in my executive summary, I believe the first two sections were designed to generate alarm about what’s happening and largely hidden from public view, point out the direction in which we’re blindly being led, and educate us about the associated dire consequences unless we change direction and have a more informed public discussion. My assessment is that Bruce intentionally skews the balance a bit between costs and benefits to get our attention in these two sections. I say this because, if you read carefully, he makes a couple of more balanced references to definite benefits to society as a result of the collection and use of our data by governments and the commercial world. Instead of rehashing the first two sections or arguing about whether the balance between security and privacy in surveillance is correctly addressed, I will focus my comments on what I consider to be one of the most foundational and beneficial elements of the book. This is found in the last section, what to do about it, and begins with Chapter 12, Principles.

In Chapter 12, Schneier outlines six important principles that I consider an excellent starting point for a much broader public–private discourse about data collection and use than exists today. As he points out in the chapter opening, these are general principles about universal truths involving surveillance, and while it’s easy to agree about the principles, it’s much more difficult applying them to the world in which we live. Still, I took these as foundational elements upon which genuine dialogue that considers all angles can occur. I was also impressed because the six principles tie together three equally critical points of view – governments, commercial industries and people.

While I cannot adequately cover them in detail in this review, the six general principle categories are: Security and Privacy (as opposed to Security versus Privacy); Security Over Surveillance (meaning this is an “either/or” proposition, and the priority must go toward security); Transparency (how technological and social trends are demanding less government and corporate secrecy); Oversight and Accountability (focusing on tactical oversight – which is about doing things right, and strategic oversight – which is about doing the right things, as well as ensuring penalties for abuse of either); Resilient Design (including resilience to hardware and software failure, as well as to technological innovation, political change, and coercion); and One World, One Network, One Answer (deciding whether or not we build our information infrastructure for security, surveillance, privacy or resilience … because everyone, friend or foe, gets to use that same infrastructure).

There is a lot of current discussion about norms of responsible behavior in the digital environment. The United Nations Group of Government Experts began the process. Presidents Obama and Xi discussed norms in their agreement of 2015. The G7 and, later, the G20 agreed on several norms of responsible behavior. The problem is that these norms are largely about interaction between governments, yet the digital environment is owned, operated and maintained predominantly by the private sector. And of course, nearly everyone on the planet has their hands on devices connected to this environment.

I believe the principles outlined in this book provide a much broader set of foundational ideas that pertain equally to governments, the commercial industries and people – ideas that could serve as the basis for the formulation of improved norms of responsible behavior, more effective government and industry policies and regulations, and perhaps even more balanced national and international laws relevant to the digital age. In fact, that’s exactly how the book concludes. Each chapter following the principles provides specific recommendations for what governments, commercial entities and ordinary people can talk about and do to better balance the crucial issues surrounding the ways our data is collected and used.

Conclusion

I think this is a book for just about anyone who is, or should be, interested in what’s happening with the collection and use of our data. It’s written in plain English, easy to read, relatively short, current, relevant and compelling. For the professional cybersecurity community, I think this book is a must-read. Having served most of my life in the U.S. national security community and more than a decade and a half fighting terrorism, I don’t always agree with each point in the book regarding where the right balance is between costs and benefits. However, having been in the commercial cybersecurity industry for almost two years, I have a great deal of respect for the varying views on these increasingly important issues. As far as I’m concerned, this book is an important contribution to a much-needed, much more open dialogue to ensure we are making informed decisions in the digital age.

Source: https://researchcenter.paloaltonetworks.com/2017/10/cybersecurity-canon-data-goliath-hidden-battles-collect-data-control-world/

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Consistency is Key for IoT Security

Category : Palo Alto

A version of the below excerpted article originally appeared in SecurityWeek

From Wi-Fi enabled televisions to smart toasters, the Internet of Things is transformational to the digital age. As exciting as it might be to discover that your toast is finished via cellphone notification, this influx of technology poses a new layer of risk to organizations. The projected number of connected devices is expected to reach 20 billion by 2020, meaning that even a small number of infected devices can yield big security risks.

So, how can organizations protect their networks from IoT vulnerabilities? According to Scott Simkin’s recent article in SecurityWeek, the answer is consistency. Scott explains that consistency in identification, prevention and policy enforcement should be applied similarly to IoT, as it is to network, cloud and endpoint security. To successfully maintain consistency, he says organizations must have these three things:

  • Complete visibility across multiple locations and network domains in the IoT value chain – You cannot prevent threats you cannot see. Organizations must apply the same full visibility into applications, content and users to create informed policy control for their IoT devices, as they would for their network.
  • Natively Integrated Security Functions –Integrated security functions that work together, sharing consistent information to reduce your IoT threat footprint.
  • High levels of automation across these functions and locations in order to rapidly identify advanced attacks and ensure that new security enforcement mechanisms can be deployed in near-real time. – Highly automated security prevents not only known threats, but also arms organizations with real-time traffic flow analysis to make unknown threats known.

A consistent approach to security can help your organization detect and stop advanced cyber threats.

Read the rest of Scott Simkin’s article at SecurityWeek.

 Source: https://researchcenter.paloaltonetworks.com/2017/09/consistency-key-iot-security/
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Protect Yourself From Antivirus

Category : Palo Alto

Prevent Security Breaches.

Protect Your Users.

Secure Your Endpoints.

Traditional antivirus (AV) is not the solution to endpoint security – it’s the problem. AV can no longer stop today’s threats. Traps™ advanced endpoint protection is the only product offering that replaces AV with “multi-method prevention”: a proprietary combination of malware and exploit prevention methods that pre-emptively block both known and unknown threats.


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What Do Best-of-Breed Security Products and Top NFL Draft Picks Have in Common?

Category : Palo Alto

Analyzed individually, they can’t predict success.

“Poor build, skinny. Lacks great physical stature and strength, lacks mobility and ability to avoid the rush, lacks a really strong arm, can’t drive the ball downfield … gets knocked down easily.”

Whether you’re a football fan or not, if asked from whose NFL scouting report this quote was taken, chances are your answer would not be one of the most decorated quarterbacks in NFL history. Yet while the NFL didn’t initially have high hopes for Tom Brady, he went on to lead five Super Bowl wins and seven Super Bowl appearances with the New England Patriots – and he’s still playing.

In contrast, the NFL thought very differently about 2007 No. 1 draft pick JaMarcus Russell. As one analyst described, “Three years from now you could be looking at a guy that’s certainly one of the elite top five quarterbacks in this league … look out because the skill level that he has is certainly John Elway-like.”2 However, after three years, Russell was unceremoniously released from the Oakland Raiders.

On and off the field, we’ve seen this happen before: apparent underdogs surprising the world and the seemingly best players never realizing their full potential. That’s because individual components can’t predict the success of an entire team. It’s the team as a whole – specifically, how players integrate and communicate – that makes it great and successful.

Best-of-Breed Is Not a Strategy

Having good players is important, but it is not strategic. Strategy is found in integration, not individuals. As the JaMarcus Russell example demonstrates, a top pick often doesn’t translate into wins. Who you put on your team is one part of building winners, but bringing them all together into a singular whole is where the art of strategy lies. The New England Patriots understand this. The team has been organized under the same framework with coach Bill Belichick for the past 17 years. While players with varying skill levels come and go, the consistent structure gives the team a common platform upon which to perform. Whether a player was a first- or sixth-round draft pick is irrelevant to how they perform as part of that team. The most recognized players on the roster were not originally considered best-of-breed.

Recently retired Rob Ninkovich, a fifth-round draft pick, joined the Patriots after six mediocre years in the NFL, playing for the New Orleans Saints and the Miami Dolphins before being released after his second stint with the Saints. Once New England brought him on board, he became an integral part of the team’s defense for five years, helping the team win two Super Bowls and further proving that a proper strategy for success is about integration and communication, not individual best-of-breed players. “I didn’t play in Miami – their wonderful 1-15 team (in 2007). Couldn’t play on that team,“ Ninkovich said sarcastically during his recent retirement speech.3

Winning Integration + Winning Communication = A Winning Team

Just like you can’t judge how good a football team is by looking at the number of top draft picks on the roster, you can’t judge how secure an organization is by looking at the number of so-called “best-of-breed” products in their security lineup. A better indicator is how everything integrates and communicates in a platform approach. “Best of breed” is not a strategy; it is a tactic. With disparate, unrelated and unintegrated point products, network defenders have the difficult task of maintaining multiple products. This additional complexity actually increases risk, because it creates a greater opportunity for human error and mis-configuration to be injected into the system. We’ve talked often about how a “conga line” of security products that don’t seamlessly integrate is doing more harm than good – and vacuuming up budget that could be spent on more strategic investments.

Preventing cyber events and data breaches requires simplification. It requires having integrated, automated and effective controls in place to detect and prevent threats, both known and unknown, at every stage of the attack lifecycle. This is where the platform approach comes in. The power of the Next-Generation Security Platform comes from the sum of all components, fueled by a global threat intelligence engine that leverages the network effects of thousands of customers, technology partners and researchers sharing threat information. Just like a winning football team bringing on new players, with a natively integrated security platform in place, organizations can securely adopt new applications and technologies while maintaining a comprehensive and consistent prevention-oriented security posture.

Learn more about our Next-Generation Security Platform.

1https://www.si.com/extra-mustard/2017/03/03/tom-brady-nfl-combine-scouting-report

2https://www.si.com/nfl/photos/2010/05/10jamarcus-russell-pre-draft-hype

3http://nesn.com/2017/07/rob-ninkovich-explains-decision-to-reitre-i-was-honest-with-myself/

Source: https://researchcenter.paloaltonetworks.com/2017/09/best-breed-security-products-top-nfl-draft-picks-common/

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Palo Alto Networks Meets With Pentagon and International Officials

Category : Palo Alto

Last week Palo Alto Networks had the honor of meeting with an international delegation of defense and intelligence officials at the Pentagon’s Silicon Valley innovation outpost: Defense Innovation Unit Experimental (known as DIUx) at Moffett Field. This delegation consisted of 31 CIOs, IT and security leaders from across the U.S. Defense Department, and included 13 foreign officials from NATO, the United Kingdom, Canada, New Zealand, Germany and Japan. This meeting was part of the delegation’s annual industry engagement trip to Silicon Valley and other West Coast centers of technology innovation. Up front, I applaud Dr. John Zangardi, acting Department of Defense Chief Information Officer, for leading this delegation and conducting essential outreach to industry regarding the future of innovation across technology sectors of significant interest to our national security, and that of allies and close partners.

Our CEO, Mark McLaughlin, led the discussion with our President Mark Anderson; Lee Klarich, executive vice president for product management; Nick Urick, president of our public sector LLC (a U.S.-only federal subsidiary); David Colberg, senior director for government affairs; and myself. Mark provided an overview of his role as a member of the National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee and other areas where Palo Alto Networks provides our industry perspective and counsel to the federal government, including our participation in the IT Sector Coordinating Council’s Executive Committee, Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity Information Sharing and Collaboration and Automated Indicator Sharing programs, Defense Department’s Defense Cybersecurity Information Sharing Environment, and NATO’s Malware Information Sharing Platform. Mark explained how Palo Alto Networks regularly shares operational cyberthreat information with the DoD and its cybersecurity organizations in order to enable them to further strengthen protections across defense critical infrastructure. As a company, we firmly believe that this public and private sector exchange of information sharing plays a key role in preventing and stopping successful cyberattacks.

We also discussed our ideas about how the U.S. government, its allies and its close partners can take a significant leadership position that will change the paradigm of security over the next decade. This included a discussion on several important evolutions in security impacting not only the definition of cybersecurity but also how the entire cybersecurity consumption model will be disrupted in the near future. There are several current and emerging technological developments making this possible, including secure movement to the cloud, automated orchestration of security capabilities, innovation in network design, machine learning, and quantum computing.

As a company, Palo Alto Networks believes that private industry has both the technical ability and responsibility as security innovation leaders to collaborate with the DoD, other critical operational U.S. government agencies involved in cybersecurity, and those of the United States’ allies and close partners on their important cybersecurity missions.

Source: https://researchcenter.paloaltonetworks.com/2017/08/gov-cso-palo-alto-networks-meets-pentagon-international-officials-west-coast-trip/

Author: John Davis


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Palo Alto Networks Now a Six-Time Gartner Magic Quadrant Leader!

Category : Palo Alto

Gartner’s 2017 Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Network Firewalls has been released, and Palo Alto Networks is proud to be positioned in the Leaders quadrant for the sixth consecutive year. I invite you to read the 2017 Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Network Firewalls report.

Gartner’s Magic Quadrant provides a graphical competitive positioning of technology providers in markets where growth is high and provider differentiation is distinct. Leaders execute well against their stated visions and are well-positioned for tomorrow. Gartner researchers continue to highlight both our ability to execute and the completeness of our vision. You can find more details in the report.

More than 39,500 customers in more than 150 countries have chosen Palo Alto Networks to realize the benefits of a truly next-generation security platform, safeguard critical assets, and prevent known and unknown threats. To protect our customers and stay ahead of sophisticated cyberattackers, we maintain a steadfast commitment to innovation. We recently introduced several more disruptive capabilities:

  • Application Framework: With a SaaS-based consumption model, Palo Alto Networks Application Framework allows customers to use new apps to solve the most challenging security use cases with the best technology available, without the cost and operational burden of deploying new infrastructure.
  • GlobalProtect cloud serviceGlobalProtect cloud service eases your next-generation firewall and GlobalProtect deployment by leveraging cloud-based security infrastructure operated by Palo Alto Networks.
  • Logging Service: Palo Alto Networks Logging Service is a cloud-based offering for context-rich, enhanced network logs generated by our security offerings, including those of our next-generation firewalls and GlobalProtect cloud service.

DISCLAIMER: Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

 Source: https://researchcenter.paloaltonetworks.com/2017/07/palo-alto-networks-now-six-time-gartner-magic-quadrant-leader/
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Palo Alto Networks Now a Six-Time Gartner Magic Quadrant Leader!

Category : Palo Alto

Gartner’s 2017 Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Network Firewalls has been released, and Palo Alto Networks is proud to be positioned in the Leaders quadrant for the sixth consecutive year. I invite you to read the 2017 Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Network Firewalls report.

Gartner’s Magic Quadrant provides a graphical competitive positioning of technology providers in markets where growth is high and provider differentiation is distinct. Leaders execute well against their stated visions and are well-positioned for tomorrow. Gartner researchers continue to highlight both our ability to execute and the completeness of our vision. You can find more details in the report.

More than 39,500 customers in more than 150 countries have chosen Palo Alto Networks to realize the benefits of a truly next-generation security platform, safeguard critical assets, and prevent known and unknown threats. To protect our customers and stay ahead of sophisticated cyberattackers, we maintain a steadfast commitment to innovation. We recently introduced several more disruptive capabilities:

  • Application Framework: With a SaaS-based consumption model, Palo Alto Networks Application Framework allows customers to use new apps to solve the most challenging security use cases with the best technology available, without the cost and operational burden of deploying new infrastructure.
  • GlobalProtect cloud serviceGlobalProtect cloud service eases your next-generation firewall and GlobalProtect deployment by leveraging cloud-based security infrastructure operated by Palo Alto Networks.
  • Logging Service: Palo Alto Networks Logging Service is a cloud-based offering for context-rich, enhanced network logs generated by our security offerings, including those of our next-generation firewalls and GlobalProtect cloud service.

DISCLAIMER: Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

 Source: https://researchcenter.paloaltonetworks.com/2017/07/palo-alto-networks-now-six-time-gartner-magic-quadrant-leader/
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Preventing Cybercrime Through Collaboration and Information Sharing

Category : Palo Alto

Cybercrime is not something that any one entity can tackle alone, and increasingly, companies are understanding the importance of information sharing in preventing successful cyberattacks.

In our recent State of Cybersecurity in Asia-Pacific survey, 44 per cent of organisations across the region have already started sharing threat information with other companies in their industry. The exposure of malicious cyber actors and their techniques plays an important role in changing their behavior. The more broadly information about threats is shared, the more efficiently organisations can work to prevent cyberattacks.

This week, we became the first cybersecurity company to sign a Data Exchange Agreement (DEA) with INTERPOL. Aimed to combat criminal trends in cyberspace, cyberthreats and cybercrime, this agreement marks a mutual commitment to openly share threat intelligence and equip law enforcement officers with powerful information needed to prevent cybercrime.

In addition to our involvement in the Cyber Threat Alliance and our role earlier this year in the INTERPOL-led operation targeting cybercrime across the ASEAN region, this agreement underscores our commitment to threat intelligence sharing.

For more information, please read our press release about our collaboration with INTERPOL.

 Source: https://researchcenter.paloaltonetworks.com/2017/08/cso-preventing-cybercrime-collaboration-information-sharing/
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